Raw Leicester Longwool Fleece - "Doris"

Raw Leicester Longwool Fleece - "Doris"

from 7.00

Raw Fleece Locks from my ewe Doris. After her vindictive attitude towards shearing, these are very well worth the wait (she is a…stabby thing…she goes for the jugular!) She also happens to be my best bud, so I can understand her taking it a bit personally…

NOT coated, there is some vm, dirt and some tarry tips on some sections of fleece that does come out.

Staples Ranging from 4.5-7”

offered in 2oz or 6oz* quantities

NOW AVAILABLE in 1 lb quantities

I will choose similarly structured bunches for best uniformity.

These locks will NOT be picked apart, it is as it comes off the fleece. Although I will try my best to keep them “organized” you will have to do this process yourself (part of the fun!)

For me doing such a large batch, the tips stayed ivory, but with a little more attention in smaller batches, I was able to get it whiter. For dyeing, the ivory tint doesn’t bother me.

6oz* weighed bundle qualifies for Shave '‘em to Save ‘em!

*Although rules state you need only 4oz, I am offering 6oz in the raw fleece only to account for weight loss during processing. This way, the person processing can feel good about having a solid 4oz of finished product to work with for their project.

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Those that regularly wash locks will probably each have their own process. For those that don’t do it often, or find it intimidating, STOP! Although locks take time to process, because it is a longwool breed, the wool can be fairly forgiving of even beginners, especially when done in small batches. Here is what works for me:

Before you begin, it may help some to line the locks all in the same direction, tip to cut butt. (I have also done it just throwing the fleece in the bath, and it works, but even that stresses me out.) Due to the nature of this fleece, I recommend a good long cold soak (I did 18-24 hrs). Followed by slowy bring up temperature so as not to shock, then scouring them with your favorite wool scouring agent. If you have a spray attachment, use that on tips, going in direction of the length of fiber. Gently rub locks between fingers to get out extra grubby bits. Finish with your favorite Fibre Rinse for ultimate softness and manageability.

Finally, have fun dyeing! Or leave natural colored (tips ivory stained).

For me doing such a large batch, the tips stayed ivory, but with a little more attention in smaller batches, I was able to get it whiter. For dyeing, the ivory tint doesn’t bother me.